Thursday, May 19, 2011

Divorce is Not a Dirty Word


In the last year, several of the women I know - some as acquaintances and others as close friends - have either separated from their husbands or begun divorce proceedings. One night as I snuggled up to Bubba on the couch after he beat me (again) at Scrabble, I said, "Seems like everyone we know is getting divorced." I was trying to sound casual, but really, I was shocked. Bubba and I have been married for 17 years. Most of our friends have been married as long and have kids, stable jobs, and own houses. Every time I heard of someone in our social circle having relationship challenges, my mind would begin firing from all corners, desperately trying to make connections that would convince me Bubba and I are immune to similar issues. It was very much the same process I went through as a teenager when a parent or teacher would tell the story of someone my age who got pregnant/overdosed on illegal drugs/wrecked their car. "Not me, and here's why," my brain would assure me with as many bullet points as it took to bring my heart rate and hyperventilation under control.

As a child of divorced parents, I always wanted to make it about the Worst Case Scenario. Well, they got divorced because there was abuse or someone cheated. I'll never marry someone who could do that to me, right? Of course, that forced me to confront all sorts of things about my parents that I didn't particularly want to think about, such as: how could they not know what the other person was like when they got married, or how could one of them treat the other one so poorly, etc.

A few months ago I was having lunch with a friend who was getting divorced after 17 years of marriage. The couple has three children and she and her husband are bending over backwards to make sure that the kids remain front and center in their lives. Theirs will be an amicable divorce. But that doesn't spare either of them from the stigma and judgment offered from friends, family, and society-at-large. Those who think they are intimate enough ask for details - why? I suspect that it is less out of some sense of voyeurism than a desire to then perform the mental machinations that result in, "Whew! That's why this couldn't be me." Those who don't outright ask for details either assume answers or sneak about to discover them. This friend of mine said that one of her closest girlfriends, upon learning that the couple was divorcing, said to her, "Congratulations on 17 years of marriage. You guys had a good run and produced some damn fine kids."

Whoa. Cool. She's absolutely right.

It's none of my damn business why anyone else's relationship ends. Unless one party is a victim of the other one and is asking for my help, I don't even want to know. Honestly, when I look back at my own life and realize what a completely different person I am now as compared to when I got married, it's a wonder I haven't had to change my name to reflect the metamorphosis I've gone through. And it's the same for everyone.

How many of us knew beyond the shadow of a doubt what we wanted to be "when we grew up" at the age of 10? I did. A pediatrician. Or a teacher. Am I either of those things? Not remotely. Who knew what they wanted to be when they declared a college major? I did. A family practitioner in some small, rural podunk town on the West Coast. Am I there yet? No, thank goodness.

There are some fundamental things that have remained steady in my life since I was young; my love for animals and nature, my sense of justice, my idealism, and my constant search for knowledge. But my taste in food, clothing (thank God - I had the 80s rocker-chick hair and parachute pants), books, and nearly everything else has evolved. When I married Bubba, I was certain of a few, core things - I was going to medical school, I was never going to have children, and we would be married until the day we died. Didn't make it to medical school after spending a few years working as a surgical assistant. That was a game-changer during the first days of healthcare reform a la HMOs. Lasted six years of marriage before waking up one day and feeling a yearning to be a mother so strongly that I couldn't think of anything else. As for my marriage, it is strong and healthy and I still hope that we will stay together forever, but I'm not making any bets.

People change. There is no such thing as "grown up." The reasons we fall in love with someone and get married are often perfectly "right" at the time. And over time we learn and evolve and grow. And our partners do, too. But we don't always do this in syncronicity.

The divorce rates in the United States went up sharply from the mid 1960s to the early 1980s. They have since leveled off some, and even dropped a bit after 2000. I don't claim to know the reasons for this, but I do know that as long as marriage is around, divorce will be around, too. According to a website called Divorce Guide, these are the top 10 reasons people get divorced:

1. Infidelity
2. Lack of communication
3. Abuse (emotional/physical/sexual)
4. Money issues
5. Sexual incompatibility
6. Religious/cultural differences
7. Boredom
8. Parenting issues
9. Addiction issues
10. Priority differences

I'm pretty sure that the entire list could be boiled down to two things - communication issues and priority differences. And the fact is, those are the things that change most within individuals over time. When we are in our 20s, most of us are beginning to figure out how to communicate effectively with others. Introduce children to the mix and you start all over again. As for priorities, mine shift slightly with every new life experience I have. When I think about it this way, I begin to understand fully why my friend's girlfriend said what she did. It is hard work to maintain relationships with people. And choosing to end a relationship is always hard, regardless of whether it is a co-worker, close friend or partner. But sometimes it is necessary. So instead of feeling sad for my friends who are getting divorced, I choose to compliment them on their success in navigating the tricky waters of marriage for as long as they were able, and support them in their efforts to find happiness in their lives as they move forward.

9 comments:

Anonymous said...

Another amazing post Kari. Your friend is very fortunate to have you as a friend, I am very fortunate to have you as a friend. While you never know where life will bring you, the most precious gift is to be able to rely on friends like you. Thank you for for friendship.

-Isabelle

Wanda said...

That is an amazing comment on hearing about the impending divorce. Would that we could all be so wise!

Elizabeth said...

I'm pretty sure the reason why divorce rates have stabilized of late is that people can't AFFORD to get divorced. Really. I read it somewhere and it makes a hell of a lot of sense.

Here's to happy and happier marriages...

Bella said...

Kario, I am in complete agreement with you--a breakdown in communication and priority differences are strong contenders for what breaks a marriage. I would add that lack of empathy, respect and common interests are also deal breakers. It's also heartbreaking to hear someone is getting divorced, especially after 17 years. Thank goodness for family and good friends since they make for a strong support net.

Thereza Howling said...

It's hard to conceive that people still get married believing both persons involved will remain the same forever... and I am not talking physically. The changes are huge, and quite often it is hard to keep up with them, for both sides.
I am glad those friends of yours have you to support them!

Deb Shucka said...

What great wisdom here! I love the idea of celebrating what was at least as strongly as grieving what is lost.

pennyjars said...

Communication is huge and once the children are involved, marriage becomes a circus act. I like your realistic approach to this, Kari. I've heard that who you would marry at 20 is different than who you would marry at 30. I can attest to that. Lucky is the marriage that grows together rather than apart.

fullsoulahead.com said...

Love this post. Love that woman's remark to her friend. She's right, divorce does not mean failure. In many cases it means major growth and expansion.

Alicia (Dr. Mom) said...

amazing post. and as a woman with a divorce under her belt, i loved your thoughts.

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